Learning to Listen: Part 9 – Whose writing is it, anyway?

This is a student’s response to the question, “What do you wish your teachers knew about you?” Click here to read other articles from blog series, Learning to Listen.

Writing Conference 1: You need a better lead. 

Writing Conference 2: You need a better conclusion. 

Writing Conference 3: Perfect! 

It was no longer my literature, it was my teacher’s writing. 

I wish my teacher knew how I wanted my writing to be. 

This piece has been edited slightly for brevity and clarity.

Learning to Listen: Part 8 – Doodling is my meditation.

This is a student’s response to the question, “What do you wish your teachers knew about you?” Click here to read other articles from blog series, Learning to Listen.

Teachers are probably people who know most about children after parents and child psychologists. Yet, they don’t know everything about all their students. Honestly, who can blame them? They have so many students (a lot of work). 

Here are things I wish they knew about me: 

I don’t like working in a group.

I understand that most of our life is spent in working in a group, and blah blah. But, we also spend a lot of our lives alone. I prefer working alone because I don’t have to depend on anyone, I can choose what I want to do, and I don’t have to talk. I think students must be given a choice on whether they’d like to work in a group or alone.

Doodling soothes me.

Doodling is my meditation. Although people say, you can’t do two things and concentrate on both, I can, with doodling. It helps me concentrate and get things in order.

Ditto to music

We should be allowed to play music and work!

This piece has been edited slightly for brevity and clarity.

Learning to Listen: Part 7 – I wish you knew what I looked like.

This is a student’s response to the question, “What do you wish your teachers knew about you?” Click here to read other articles from blog series, Learning to Listen.

“Are you a new student?” 

My teacher didn’t even know that I was present in the class for one whole year. 

I wish she noticed me. 

“Who are you?” 

My teacher couldn’t recognize me on the one day I didn’t wear a hijab. 

I wish she knew what I looked like. 

This piece has been edited slightly for brevity and clarity.

Learning to Listen: Part 6 – I don't care.

This is a student’s response to the question, “What do you wish your teachers knew about you?” Click here to read other articles from blog series, Learning to Listen.

I really, truly, don’t care! 

I don’t want any of my teachers to know anything about me. Whatever they already know is enough. No more. 

What if I wish that my teacher knows that I am a good dancer and have also learnt three stunts? She might just tell this to mom and dad in a parents-teachers meeting. My dad doesn’t like dance. He will be shocked, will begin to worry about my studies and bring on a big stress in his life.

It is enough for my teacher to know only about my studies.  

This piece has been edited slightly for brevity and clarity.

Learning to Listen: Part 5 – The Weight of Words

This is a student’s response to the question, “What do you wish your teachers knew about you?” Click here to read other articles from blog series, Learning to Listen.

What would you want your teacher to know about you? 

I wish my teacher knew that every time she says, “You’re not doing well,” her simple words slowly lodged themselves in my mind and turned into nightmares. Similarly, when she says, “Well done,” her two words made my day amazing and full of happiness. 

I wish my teachers never stood behind me reading my work. They don’t know just how nervous and uneasy it makes me feel. 

Before giving me loads of homework, my teacher should know I am not only a student but also a sister, daughter, and a friend. 

I used to wish that my teachers knew about the things I am good at. But with time and thirteen years of experience as a student, I wish they know about everything I’m good and bad at. This way, I won’t have to admit what I’m bad at and shock them. 

This piece has been edited slightly for brevity and clarity.

Learning to Listen: Part 4 – There's Always a Reason.

This is a student’s response to the question, “What do you wish your teachers knew about you?” Click here to read other articles from blog series, Learning to Listen.

“Vira, go to your place and solve the sum,” the Math teacher yelled at me.

“Vira, why didn’t you complete your work? Go out and complete it,” the science teacher was on fire. 

“Vira, why didn’t you answer these questions? Maybe you didn’t complete your reading. Go and answer them,” the world history teacher said in the loudest voice possible. 

My English teacher asked for spellings I hadn’t done. With hands on her hips, she said, “I am not going to check your spellings tomorrow.” The whole class laughed. I was deeply embarrassed.

That day was one of the worst days of 8th grade. I got scolded from almost all teachers. At home, I sat at my neatly arranged study table staring at the unfinished Hindi draft. Many thoughts blinked in my head. 

Why don’t teachers understand the situations we are in? If they don’t, how can they scold us? 

I wish my math teacher understood that I didn’t do the HW because I didn’t know how to solve the sum. 

I wish my world history teacher knew that the reading was difficult to understand. It’s not that I hadn’t read it.

I wish my English teacher knew that I couldn’t manage to get to spellings yesterday after all the other HW.

I wish all my teachers knew that there’s always a reason behind what appears to be “not enough.” 

This piece has been edited slightly for brevity and clarity.

Learning to Listen: Part 3 – I am not dumb.

This is a student’s response to the question, “What do you wish your teachers knew about you?” Click here to read other articles from blog series, Learning to Listen.

Several teachers teach me every day, but everyone behaves with me in the same way. When teachers look at me they think I am a dumb person and it’s better not to ask me any question.

I want them to know that even if I look dumb, there are many ideas going on in my head that no one understands. 

When a question is asked, I don’t have the courage to raise my hand like other students do. I wish my teachers realize that whenever they themselves say, “Hey Ramani, answer this question,” I answer well every time. But when a teacher says, “Okay, just call out the answer, anyone,” I don’t answer most of the time because of the fact that the answer that was in my head gets shared by someone before me. I am then left with no other choice but to say, “I agree with others.”

Another thing that I want teachers to know about me is I never lie to any teacher. If I have not completed the given task I accept it even if my responsibility grade is affected. If there was a grade for honesty I am sure I would have gotten an A.

This piece has been edited slightly for brevity and clarity.